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Matches 2,001 to 2,050 of 2,082

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
2001 Y, in infancy Lusby, William (I7458)
 
2002 Y, in infancy Davis, Dovie Mae (I5338)
 
2003 Y, in infancy Davis, Handy Howard (I5337)
 
2004 Y, in infancy Davis, Ida Belle (I5327)
 
2005 Y, in infancy Shepherd, James W. (I4934)
 
2006 Y, in infancy Riddle, Ruth (I4401)
 
2007 Y, in infancy Riddle, Francis Margaret (I4368)
 
2008 Y, in infancy Coffey, Charles (I3755)
 
2009 Y, in infancy Elliott, Barbara (I2802)
 
2010 Y, in infancy from whooping cough. Riddle, Garfield (I7507)
 
2011 Y, in infancy. Metcalf, Vincent (I9981)
 
2012 Y, Killed in Viet Nam. Waycaster, Richard (I4357)
 
2013 Y, Stillborn Riddle, Ison (I9000)
 
2014 Y, Stillborn Riddle, Edmond (I8999)
 
2015 Y, very young Lusby, Albert Franklin (I2685)
 
2016 Y, when thrown from a horse Shepherd, Serafina (I4913)
 
2017 Yancey Co. Marriage Book shows: 28 Mar 1908 Ulyses Riddle, age 20, to Bessie Allen, age 16, by M.C. Ray, JP Witn. W.F. McPeters and Blaine Riddle. Another record is shown: 24 Dec. 1914 Ulyses Riddle, age 27, to Lilly Hill, age 24, by A.G. Wilson, JP Witn. E.. Rice, A.E. Wilson, and W.H. Hensley. This needs more research. Family F1201
 
2018 Yancey Co. Marriage Book shows: 28 Mar 1908 Ulyses Riddle, age 20, to Bessie Allen, age 16, by M.C. Ray, JP Witn. W.F. McPeters and Blaine Riddle. Another record is shown: 24 Dec. 1914 Ulyses Riddle, age 27, to Lilly Hill, age 24, by A.G. Wilson, JP Witn. E.. Rice, A.E. Wilson, and W.H. Hensley. This needs more research. Family F1200
 
2019 Yancey Co. Marriage Book shows: 4 April 1914 Quillin Riddle, age 23, to Delphia Wheeler, age 17, by A.G. Wilson, JP 'Cemeteries in Part of Yancey County, N.C.' by Charles W. Hutchins, pub. 1976 shows d. Dec.17, 1967, buried in Riddle Cem. #29 Riddle, Quillin E. (I3055)
 
2020 Yancey Co. Marriages 1850-1920
S M RIDDLE 19 - Martha M YOUNG 20 - 25 Dec 1881 - M P Ray - R M Ray, M Ray, S H Riddle. 
Family F1247
 
2021 Yancey Co. Marriages 1850-1920
S M RIDDLE 19 - Martha M YOUNG 20 - 25 Dec 1881 - M P Ray - R M Ray, M Ray, S H Riddle. 
Riddle, Samuel M. (I3328)
 
2022 Yancey Co. Marriages 1850-1920, Benjamin E RIDDLE 18 - Julia WILSON ? - 20 Mar 1881 - W A Anderso, n - L C Roberson, T J Rust. Family F1214
 
2023 Yancey Co. Marriages 1850-1920, Ezekiel RIDDLE 18 - Eddie PETERSON 18 - 31 Dec 1891 - S P Huskin, s - W D McCourry, J W Letterman, Joseph Huskins. Family F1718
 
2024 Yancey Co., North Carolina Family F1711
 
2025 young Lusby, Thomas Maslin (I2718)
 
2026 Z. Horton appointed administrator of estate. (P's & Q's 1863). Shepherd, Grandison (I9240)
 
2027 Zadie W. Fogwell, aged 86 years, died February 14, 1947. Funeral services were held in the Rawlings Funeral Home February 17, Rev. Chas. Davis officiating minister. Burial was in Greensboro cemetery. She is survived by her husband, Sylvester Fogwell; daughter, Mrs. Earl Comegys, of Greensboro, where she died, and one brother, Mr. Louis Slaughter, of Harrington. Slaughter, Zada W. (I10293)
 
2028 Zeke Austin is belived to have been the father of one or more of Nancy's children. Riddle, Nancy L. (I4662)
 
2029 [Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
How M . M. Riddle met Sarah Jenkins Ginevia (Geneva) Angilyne (Angeline) Victory (Victora) Elen (Ellen) Riddle. This is my (Opal's) grandmother. Her spelling is in parenthesis. She was born March 21, 1861. She was fond of saying "I was born in 1861, the year the war begun!" Civil War. Her mother died and she and her father moved in with her grandparents (John and Sarah Riddle). They lived there until she was 13 and then they moved to Arkansas - but in the meantime - When she was 7 years old, she was outside playing, she saw a little girl and her mother coming. She ran in to tell her grandmother someone was coming and she was told to go let the gate down and invite them in.

They came in and the lady, after visiting a while, said, "I heard there was a doctor that lives here and he needs a wife." So, that's what happened. She became Wife Number 2.
Mrs. Opal Phillips, 2208 W. Bettis, Pocahontas, Arkansas, 72455, February 16, 1991.

How M. M. Riddle Became a Doctor. My Grandmother has told us that her Dad's (M. M. Riddle's) house burned and at age 65, he went back and took the test or whatever you have to do to get your doctor's license, and he passed with flying colors. He was a very good doctor. Mrs. Opal Phillips, 2208 W. Bettis, Pocahontas, Arkansas, 72455, February 16, 1991. 
Riddle, Meredith Monroe (I13318)
 
2030 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4483, Date of Import: Mar 27, 2000]

Notice of Sale of Real Estate:
Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of an order of the Greene circuit court, the undersigned administrator of the estate of Johnathan Riddle, deceased, will offer for sale at public auction, on the premises, on, Thursday, the 10th day of January, A.D. 1884, the undivided two-thirds of the following described real estate, situated in Greene Co, IN towit:
The northeast quarter of the southwest quarter, the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter, the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter, and the west half of the southeast quarter of the southwest quarter, all in section twenty eight, in township seven, north, of range three, west, containing one hundred and forty acres.
Said lands will be sold subject to a mortgage of $700.00 and interest thereon in favor of the Union Central Life Insurance Company.
Sale to being at 1 O'clock pm of said day.
TERMS OF SALE - One-half cash, and the residue in six months, with interest at 6 percent, waiving appraisement laws.

Martin C, Fulk
Administrator. 
Riddle, Jonathan (I11738)
 
2031 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4483, Date of Import: Mar 27, 2000]
Greene County Pleas Count:
Stephen Riddle vs. Sarah Riddle
The Defendant Denies each and every allegation in the complaint.
The Defendant for further answer and cross bill, says that she admits the marriage of Plaintiff and Defendant, and says that she has always done the part of a faithful wife, up to about the 1st day of August 1870, at which time the Plaintiff, without cause, ordered her to leave his house, and told her she could not remain any longer. That he caused her father to go after her and take her away, since which time she has lived with and been supported by her father. That since said 1st day of August the Plaintiff has failed to give her or their family any support.
That said Plaintiff, for some months before their said separation, was addicted to running after, and spending his time with women of notorious bad character for chastity, and while she cannot give the names of these persons, not the times and places, yet it become notorious, from his conduct and conversations that he was often guilty of adultery.
That among other he had illicit carnal intercourse with Cynthia Sawb, at the house of Rebecca Sawb, in the bend of Indian Creek, in Jackson Township in said Co,on the 15 day of July 1870, and on given other days before and since that time, and at given other places in the neighborhood of the said Rebecca Sawb, said other days and places being unknown to Plaintiff.
That said Plaintiff and Defendant have two children, towit: Norman Riddle aged 3 years and Mifford Riddle aged 18 months.
That the Plaintiff is not a suitable person to have the custody of said children, on account of his intemperate, lewd and other bad habits, and on account of having no fixed or permanent home. That Defendant is a suitable person to have the custody of said children and her father will assist her in raising and educating them.
Where-upon she asks that a divorce be granted herein in her favor, and that she have the custody of said children and that she have such alimony and general relief in the premises as may be just.
Rose Hairns
Attorney for Defendant. 
Family F4060
 
2032 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
(NOTE: The William W. Curtis in these records may have been a nephew or son of this William Curtis).
Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served In Organizations From Tennessee, 3rd (Clack's/Brown's) Infantry, A-D, MF Roll #121.
"W. W. Curtis, Pvt. Co. E., 3 Regiment, Tennessee appears on a Roll of the Third Tennessee from its first organization at Lynnville, Tenn., May 16, 1861, to its re-organization at Jackson, Miss., Sept. 26, 1862. "Captured at Fort Donelson, Feb. 16, 1862 and sent to Camp Douglas, Illinois. Exchanged at Vicksburg, Miss. "Captured Aug. 25, 1863 at Franklin, Tenn. paroled on giving bond of $1000. Names of Sureties: Benjamin F.Kowlett & Robert Curtis." 
Curtis, William W. (I13109)
 
2033 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1718-1780: Sketch of William Murrell
Thomas and Elizabeth (Murrell) had seven children: Jeffery, Thomas, William, Drury, Elizabeth, Mary, and Cornelius. Their third son, William, was born about 1718 in Surry County. William married Frances Pryor Smith about 1743 in Goochland County, Virginia. On November 4, 1760, William bought land from Zachariah Taylor, so it was probably about this time that he and Frances moved to Lunenburg County.
From 1764 until 1776, we see that William was assessed various tithes in Lunenburg County. In Colonial Virginia, taxes were based upon tithes, where tithers were all male members of a household 21 years of age or older and "titheable slaves."
William Murrell served in the Colonial Army of Virginia. There may be some question as to whether the records refer to this William or to his son,William, Jr. In records of the Colonial Militia we find, "Wm. Murrell, Sergt. in Va. Regt., entitled to 200 acres under King's Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, Dec. 16, 1773. Dunmore." (William Armstrong
Crozier, Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776, p. 57). I believe this is William, Sr. In all probability, if William, Jr. had served as a sergeant in the Colonial Army, he would have been made an officer in the Revolutionary Continental Army.
We see from the records that Frances Murrell died in 1765 at the age of 45. Her youngest child, Mary, was born that year, so Frances may have died in child birth. William died in 1780 in Lunenburg County at the age of 62.
Kimbro-Field: AHistory of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 77-78.
__________
1764-1776: William Murrell, Taxable Tithes
In the Virginia Tax Records, tithers were all male members of a household 21 years of age or older and "titheable slaves." Later, it was 16 and up for certain years. (Slaves were not listed in the book).
In 1764, William Murrell was assessed 3 tithes for himself, Thomas, and William, Jr. He had 250 acres of land. (Page 237).
In 1769, he was assess 1 tithe for himself. Thomasand William, Jr. had left home. Thomas was assessed 2 tithes; apparently 1for himself and 1 for a slave. (Page 285).
In 1772 and 1773, William was assessed 3 tithes for himself, Jeffry, and Drury.
In 1774 and 1775, he was assessed 4 tithes for himself, "Jeff," Drury, and James. (Pages 340 and 341).
In 1776, William was assessed 3 tithes for himself, "Jeffree," and Drury. (Page 379).
Sunlight On The Southside, List of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia, 1748-1783, by Landon C. Bell, (George S. Ferguson Co.: Philadelphia, 1931).
__________
1773, December 16: Land Bounty Certificate
Wm. Murrell, Sergt. in Va. Regt., entitled to 200 acres under King's Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, Dec. 16, 1773. Dunmore. "Land Bounty Certificates," Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776, edited by William Armstrong Crozier, (New York: The Genealogical Association,
1905), p. 57. 
Murrell, William (I13056)
 
2034 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1730, September 28: Thomas Granted 400 acres of Land Thomas Murrell,400 acs. (N.L.), Goochland Co; on the Little Byrd Cr; adj. Jonas Lawson; & George Payne; 28 Sep 1730, p. 146. 40 Shill.
Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Volume 3, 1695-1732, by Nell Marion Nugent (Virginia State Library: Richmond, 1979), p. 394.
__________
1734:Thomas Granted 71 acres of Land
Index to Land Grants, Goochland County, Book 15, Page 271: Thos. Murrell, 1734, 71 acres.
Virginia County Records Quarterly Magazine edited by william Armstrong Crozier, Vol. 7, (The Genealogical Association: Haasbrouck Heights, NJ, 1910), p. 28. 
Murrell, Thomas (I13064)
 
2035 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1747-1826: Sketch of Thomas Murrell, Sr.
Thomas Murrell, Sr. was born in 1747 in Goochland County.
In the records of 1777-1778, we find "Lists of persons renouncing allegiance to Great Britain and swearing allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia ... A list of those who have taken and subscribed the oath of affirmation of allegiance in 1777 ... Thos Murrell ... In all Eighty hath taken & subscribed the oath or affirmation of allegiance before me agreeable to act of assembly ... Witness my hand and seal this 1st day of January, 1778 ... Thomas Henderson." (William G. Standard, Editor, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 9, pp. 138-141).
Thomas and his brother, William, proved their faith in the new nation when they joined the 6th Regiment Continental Line of Virginia. Thomas' father died in 1780, so after completing his service in the Revolution, he left Virginia for the wilderness of Western North Carolina (now Tennessee). Thomas, a Baptist preacher, was probably the first of our ancestors to live in what is now Tennessee. He may have been in Sullivan County, North Carolina (now Hawkins County, Tennessee)as early as 1780. In a discussion of Baptists in Tennessee, David Benedict wrote, "But the beginning of the first churches which have had a permanent standing was in the following manner: about the year
1780, William Murphy, James Keel, THOMAS MURRELL, Tidence Lane, Isaac Barton, Mathew Talbot, Joshua Kelly and John Chastain moved into what was called Holston country, when it was in a wilderness state and much exposed to the ravages and depredations of the Indians. These ministers were all Virginians, except Mr. Lane, who was from North Carolina. They were accompanied by a considerable number of their brothers from the churches which they left." (David Benedict, A General History of the Baptist Denomination in America and other Parts of the World, pp.
214-215).
In his History of Tennessee, Goodspeed says, "about Three and one-half miles above Rogersville, Thomas Amis in 1780 or 1781 erected a stone house, around which he built a palisade for protection against the Indians. The next year he opened a store, and erected a blacksmith shop and a distillery. Very soon after he also put into operation a saw and grist-mill, and from the first he kept a house of entertainment. A Baptist Church was organized and a school established very soon after the settlement was made. The church was probably organized by THOMAS MURRELL, who located on the farm now owned by John a Chesnut on the Holston River, some time prior to 1782. (Goodspeed,History of Tennessee, Containing Historical and Biographical Sketches of Thirty East
Tennessee Counties, pp. 873-874).
(Note: The reference above was written in 1887, so when it says "now owned by John A. Chesnut," we're speaking of land owners more than one hundred years ago).
In 1783 Thomas temporarily returned to Virginia where he married Rebekah Elizabeth Martin Johnson, widow of Major James Johnson. Rebekah was born in Maryland about 1746, and was of Huguenot and French origin.
In an article written by L. H. Marsh, entitled "My Murrell Line," he told of Rebekah's first husband. On February 16, 1777, James Johnson joined the 6th Regiment Continental Line of Virginia and was made a captain. On April 1, 1777, he was promoted to major, but resigned on August 15 to go home for the birth of his son, Martin. Later he was apprehended and killed by the British. Rebekah and James had four children: Sarah, William, Judith, and Martin. (Jill K. Garrett, Editor, The Red River Counties of Middle Tennessee, Vol. 14, p. 30).
Thomas Murrell had numerous land dealings while living in what is now
Upper East Tennessee. In 1787 he acquired land in Sullivan County, North
Carolina. 
Murrell, Thomas Sr. (I13028)
 
2036 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1752 - 1820 Sketch of Reuben Gunn
Gunn originated from the Norse name Gunni, which means warlike. According to the introduction in The Gunn Reunion Cookbook, the Gunns originally came from the Vikings and made Scotland (Caithness and Sutherland) their home. True to their name, they were a warlike clan, "frequently engaged in warfare with clans Keith, MacKay, and Sutherland." (The Gunn Reunion Cookbook, p. C).
Another author says, "Towards the end of the fifteenth century, the chief of the Clan Gunn was George Gunn, who lived in feudal dignity in his then impregnable castle of Halbury; but he was better known as Crowner Gunn, or, as he was called by the Highlanders, 'N'm Braistach-more,' from a great brooch which he wore as the badge of cognisance of his office of crowner." (Alan McNie, Clan Gunn, p. 14).
It is interesting to note that a drawing punched into a rock near Westford, Massachusetts is of a shield on which a galley occurs between two large buckles. Above the ship is a star, representing the head of a clan. The drawing has been dated 1395 and identified as the ancient Coat-of-Arms of the Clan Gunn. Could a Gunn have been in America 100 years before Columbus?
We cannot trace our ancestry back to George Gunn, but it is said that anyone who bears the Gunn name "is entitled to consider themselves a part of this great clan." (The Heritage Corporation video, Gunn).
Our first known ancestor, Reuben Gunn, appears three hundred years later in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1891, Benjamin J. Gunn of Kansas, a grandson of Reuben, wrote a book on the descendants of Reuben Gunn. In his opening paragraph, he says, "The parentage and the nationality of Reuben Gunn is probably destined to remain unknown, four different branches of his family asserting, in turn, German, Scotch, Welsh, or Irish parentage; but those who favor the first seem to have the best evidence. The son of a grand duke in Germany, born about 1752, he landed at Charleston, S. C., in 1769. But little is known of his life. He married a Mrs. Hudson, a French lady whose maiden name was Goforth."
(Benjamin J. Gunn, A Complete Family Record: Descendants of Reuben Gunn, p. 13).
Unfortunately,Benjamin Gunn did not present his proof of German origin and I am inclined to disagree. It's true that Reuben is a German name, but Gunn is very Scottish. The statement that Reuben was the son of a German grand duke is highly unlikely. If this were true, it seems that his position in Germany would have afforded so much prestige, power, and money that he would have not have left. After Reuben arrived in the Colonies, the few records available suggest that he was a poor man. Finally, the time of Reuben's arrival coincides with the English persecution of the Scots, when many Scottish immigrants were settleing in Charleston. In my opinion, the evidence points toward Scottish descent.
Another point on which I take issue with Mr. Gunn is his statement that Mary Goforth, Reuben's wife, was a "French lady." Goforth is a Welch name, not French. In fact, in the last page of his book, he discusses a Rachael Goforth and says, "Rachael Goforth was born in Wales. Her father was a brother to the first wife of Reuben Gunn." (Ibid., p. 55).
We lose track of Reuben for several years, but in 1790, we find him on the census records of Greenville County, South Carolina. On March 11, 1795, in the Greenville District of Spartanburg County, he purchased 180 acres of land from Thomas Kevil. Mr. Kevil was paid 42 pounds, 10 shillings sterling for the Enoree River property. In1797, he traded for
another 100 acres on the same river. By 1807 he had sold all of his land, and before 1809 he and his family left South Carolina for Tennessee. 
Gunn, Reuben (I12890)
 
2037 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1773-1857: Sketch of George Southerland
George Southerland was born in Scotland, January 28, 1773. It is not
know whether he came to America as a child or as an adult. Before 1800,
he married awoman named Mary (last name unknown, born in 1762).
George and Mary Southerland spent the early part of their marriage in
North Carolina where their threeoldest children were born. About the
turn of the century they move to Tennessee. Goodspeed's Histories lists
him as "among the settlers who came to Dickson County between 1800 and
1810." (Goodspeed, The Goodspeed Histories of Montgomery, Robertson,
Humphreys, Stewart, Dickson, Cheatham, Houston Countiesof Tennessee,
reprinted from Goodspeed's History of Tennessee, 1886, p. 923).
George died October 28, 1857, and was buried in the Southerland Cemetery,
a beautiful plot of land near Jones Creek between White Bluff and
Charlotte.
Kimbro-Field: A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle
Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, p. 82.
__________
1810: From North Carolina Records (Was this "our" George Southerland?)
1810 - Jane Southerland to George Southerland, half interest in land in
King's Branch, fell to them by heirship, from their father, John
Southerland, who patented in 1784. (Duplin County).
Note: They may very well have been "our" George, for he had a son named
John and a daughter named Jane. Southern customs often lead parents to
name children after siblings or their own parents or grandparents.
Sutherland Records by Henry C. Sutherland (Henry C. Sutherland: Crown Point, IN, 1968), p. 112.
__________
1857, December 12: Inventory from Estate of George Southerland, Decd.
Dickson County, Tennessee, pp. 516-517.
An Inventory of the personal property belonging to the Estate of Geo Southerland decd. taken at his late residence by me on the 12th day of Dec. 1857.
1 Mare, 4 Head Cattle, 24 Head Hogs, 2 Head Sheep, 1 Wagon,
2 Beds, 1 Bureau, 1 Cupboard, 1 Kukoo (?), 1 Clock, 1 Sngle Ch?, 1 Reel,
1 Flax Wheel, 1 ?, 1 Candlestick, CupboardWall, 2 D?, 1 ?, Books & Case,
1 Loom, 1 Kettle, 2 Posts, Corn ? & Tray, Ba? & Stand, 1 Fa?, 1 Side H? Leather, 1 Dry Hide, 1 Pr. Dog Irons, Rifle ?, 1 Anvil, vice and ? Plate,
4 Angles, OC?, 1 Foot ?, 1 ?, 2 D?, 1 Cutting Block & Box, 1 Crop 1 ? L?,
3 Hand Saws, 1 Log Chain, 1 Broad Axe, 1 ? Axe, 1 ? Axe, 3 ?, 2 ?, 1 S?,
3 Pair Trace Chains, 1 Scythe & Cradle, 1 Mowing Reade, 1 Mattock,
1 Scycle, 1 Brier Hank, 1 Pr. Steelyards, Bee Hives, Wagon ?,
2 Iron Wedges, 1 Saddle,
The foregoing is a correct list of the property of the Estate of Geo Southerland decd This 4th Dec. 1857.
John Southerland, Admn. 
Southerland, George (I12894)
 
2038 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1777-1875: Sketch of William Simpson
Information about the Simpson Family is sparse and often contradictory. The first know Simpson was Reuben, Sr. who married Sarah Sherrill. A son of Reuben and Sarah was William, born in 1777. According to an article in Humphreys County Heritage, William was born in North Carolina, while another article in the same book states that he was born in Maryland. (Humphreys County Heritage, Waverly, Tennessee, Volume Two, pp. 193-194). If that's not confusing enough, the 1870 census of Humphreys County lists his birthplace as South Carolina. Since William,
himself, supplied the census information, South Carolina is probably correct.
William married Margaret Ann Maddox, born in 1783. The place of Margaret's birth is another point of contradiction. According to Humphreys County Heritage, she was born in Kentucky, but the 1870 census lists her birthplace as South Carolina. (Ibid, p. 194).
The Simpsons moved to Humphreys County from Wayne County, Kentucky about 1807. William died in 1875, but the date of Margaret's death is not known.
Kimbro-Field: A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 60-61. 
Simpson, William (I13102)
 
2039 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1785-1866: Sketch of Thomas Murrell, Jr.
Thomas Murrell, Jr. was born in 1785 in Hawkins County, North Carolina (now Tennessee). Thomas may have been the first of any of our ancestors born in what is now Tennessee. After moving to Dickson County, he married Ella F. Coen, born in 1786 in North Carolina. In addition to the inheritance he received from his father, Thomas, Jr. had numerous land dealings in Dickson County. By the middle of the 1800's he was a well-to-do and respected citizen. In 1850 he was serving as the county trustee.
Thomas, Jr. died in 1866. His will was probated in February of that year, and on March 17, 1866, it was recorded.
In his will Thomas mentioned that he had provided for his three sons. On May 26, 1866, his deed to John Murrell was recorded: "For the love and affection I entertain for my son John Murrell I hereby give transfer and convey to him his heirs and assigns forever ... a tract of land ... on the waters of Jones Creek ... containing by estimation 150 acres." It was added that it was "understood that I reserve said land for the use and benefit of me and my wife during our lifetime." (Dickson County Deeds, Book M, p. 281).
A History of the Kimbroand Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 81-82.
__________
1862, November 25: Will of Thomas Murrell, Jr.
Dickson County,Tennessee, Wills, Book B, Pages 78-80, Will No. 306.
Will and Testament of Thos Murrell Deceased I Thomas Murrell of Dickson County Tennessee make and publish this my last Will and Testament, revoking all former wills by me at any time made First I give my Soul to God who gave it me, and my Body to the dust, to be buried in a decent and Christian like manner Secondly I Will that all my Just debts be paid out of the Effects of my Estate as soon after my death as possible by my Executors Thirdly I Will and desire that my beloved wife Ella F Murrell, should she out live me, have the use & benefit of all my Estate after the payment of my debts, funeral expenses & Expenses of Administration, during her natural life, so as she may live in Ease and Comfort in her declining years, and at her death, all my Effects and property of Every description, sold by my Executors on a Credit of 12 months and the proceeds of the Same Equally divided between my two daughters Thena
Tatom, Wife of George W. Tatom and Many Jentry, Wife of Anderson Gentry or their children, should they or Either of them be dead. Now it is directed By me, that there shall be no sale of my property as above directed if my two daughters, above named can agree between themselves & divide the same upon Equal and satisfactory Terms. My reason for giving What property that I may die possessed of to my two daughters to the Exclusion of my Sons John Benjamin and Thomas Murrell is this, because they have already been provided for out of my Land, previous to this
date, they having had the full Benefit of my Land By deeds made to them and to others for their Benefits.
Lastly I hereby nominate and appoint my Friend Thos Flanary my Executor to carry out the provisions of this Will in testament whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal this 25 Nov 1862
Test Thomas C Norris
Thos. Murrell (Seal)
Thos Flanary
Dickson County Court February Term 1866
This day was presented in open Court, A paper Writing perporting to be the last will and testament of Thomas Murrell Decd which was proded to be such By the oaths of Thomas C Moris and Thomas Flanary subscribing
witnesses to the same whereupon the court ordered said Will to be recorded.
F. M. Binkley Clerk
__________
1852, March 6
Dickson County, Tennessee,Deeds, Book M, Page 4.
From: Thomas Murrell, Sr.
To: T. J. Murrell
Description: Tract of land for "the love and affecti 
Murrell, Thomas, Jr. (I13026)
 
2040 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1790 - 1832 - Sketch of Nathaniel Kimbro
Our first known ancestor was Nathaniel. Nathaniel Kimbro was born in North Carolina in 1790, but he left that state at an early age. As a young man, he was quite a wanderer. By 1818 he was living in the Alabama Territory where his oldest daughter, Patsey, was born. In 1820, we find him on the census records of Lawrence County, Alabama; a neighbor of Robert Kimbro, who was probably his brother.
Could Nathaniel have lived in Tennessee before moving to Alabama? In 1812 a Nathaniel Kimbro was on the tax list of Giles County, Tennessee. (Byron and Barbara Sistler, Early Tennessee Tax Lists, p. 112). In 1816 and 1817 we find some deeds recorded in the same county where a Nathaniel and a Robert Kimbrough had some business dealings. This is quite a coincidence, but not conclusive proof. Two pieces of evidence deny the validity of this theory. First, Nathaniel Kimbrough signed his name. "Our" Nathaniel always made his mark, implying that he could neither read nor write. Secondly, both Giles County deeds dealt with the sale of "a certain negro man named Ben." (Giles County Deeds, Book C, p. 229). I have found no records of Dickson County Kimbros owning slaves.
Supporting the theory that they are the same pair, we discover that after 1817, Nathaniel and Robert Kimbrough disappeared from Giles County. There are no other documents concerning them, nor are they listed in the 1820
census of Giles County. "Our" Nathaniel was in Alabama in 1818 (which fits the time scale), and a Robert Kimbro was his neighbor in 1820 (which also fits). If the two Nathaniels were one and the same, we might have a much clearer view of our history. The ancestry of the Giles County Nathaniel may be traceable.
On August 10, 1826, Nathaniel Kimbro paid Solomon Petty $85.00 for twenty acres of land on Turkey Creek in Dickson County. Nathaniel, his wife Mary, and his family made their final move and became permanent residents of Tennessee.
In July, 1832, Nathaniel's youngest child, Joseph (our direct ancestor), was born. Joseph may have been the first of our Kimbro ancestors born in this state.
Kimbro-Field: A Family History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 47-48.
__________
August 10, 1826 - Nathaniel comes to Tennessee
Dickson County, Tennessee, Deeds, Book D, Page 532.
From: Solomon Petty
To: Nathaniel Kimbro
Description: 20 acres of land for $85.00
This Indenture Made this tenth day of August In The Year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight hundred and twenty Six Between Solomon Petty of the County of Dickson and State of Tennessee of the one part and Nathaniel
Kimbrow of the County of Lawrence and State of Alabama of the Other part Witness both that the said Solomon Petty for and in consideration of the Sum of Eighty five Dollars to him in hand paid the receipt thereof is hereby acknowledged and by these presents or bargain, sell, alien, Convey and Confirm unto the said Nathaniel Kimbrow A Certain Tract or parcel of Land Situated lying and being in the County of Dickson and State of Tennessee aforesaid on Turkey Creek and is bounded as follows to Wit Beginning at a red Oak on the north West Side of said Creek runs
East to a Thirty Acre Tract entered in Samuel Redding Thence North with said line to the North East Corner Thence East with said line To a Stake where said Petty seventy acre Tract and that joins Thence North With Seventy Acre line to Elm and Sugar Tree on the South east Side of Said Creek Thence With a Conditional Line to a Spanish Oak in the said Seventy Acre line Thence south thirteen poles to the Beginning Containing Twenty Acres of The same More or less with the Hereditaments and Appurtenances thereunto belonging or in 
Kimbro, Nathaniel (I12956)
 
2041 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1791-1839 Sketch of Lawson Gunn
"Reuben and Mary Gunn had eight children; seven boys and one girl. Their sixth child, also their sixth son, was Lawson. Lawson was born June 17, 1791, in South Carolina, but spent most of his life in Tennessee. "One June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain. By the end of 1813, it had spread to the South. In January of1814, Drury Adkins raised a company of Dickson County volunteers. Lawson Gunn and his brothers, Elisha and Abisha, were among those who joined. This unit was placed under the command of Colonel Napier as the First Regiment Tennessee Militia.
"In all probability the Gunn brothers never fought the British, but were sent to Northern Alabama. On March 27, 1814, Andrew Jacdson and his Tennessee Sharpshooters defeated the Creek Indians (British allies) at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, and destroyed the power of that Indian nation. (Thisbattle and the battles that preceded it are sometimes referred to as the Creek Indian War. Actually, this was was the result of and part of the War of 1812).
"By the end of 1814, Lawson was out of the militia and back home in Tennessee. On December 1 of that year he married Mary Hedge. "Between 1820 and1868 we find a lot of deeds and grants where Lawson bought and sold numerousplots of land. All of the land deals were on and around Garner's Creek in Dickson County. "In June of 1839, Lawson had the distinction of serving on 'the first grand jury' in Dickson County 'of which there is a record.' (The Goodspeed Histories of Montgomery, Robertson, Humphreys, Stewart, Dickson, Cheatham, Houston Counties of Tennessee, pp. 930-931). (One of the indictments returned by this grand jury was against James Bruce for assault and battery. Oddly enough, the plaintiff in this case was Anderson England, an ancestor on my mother's side of the family).
"Lawson and Mary Gunn had eleven children.The seventh child was William Carroll, born August 14, 1831 (our direct ancestor)."
Kimbro-Field: A Family History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, p. 54.
__________
War of 1812
Gunn, Lawson
1 Reg't (Napier's) Tennessee Militia
War of 1812
Private/Private
Index of Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers who served during the War of 1812, National Archives of the United States, Microcopy No. 602, Roll No. 87.
__________
Drury Adkins Company - War of 1812
Dickson County
"Drury Adkins was captain and the roll was dated beginning 28 Jan. 1814, ending 10 May 1814, and served under Colonel Napier. Officers were SamuelStory, first lieutenant, ELISHA GUNN, ensign, David Fentress, sergeant, andAndrew (or Arthur) Nesbitt, sergeant."
Included in the roll: Lawson Gunn
Aliga (Abisha?) Gunn (with note by MKK that Abisha is correct)
The River Counties edited by Jill K. Garrett, Vol. 10, Nos. 1-4, Whole Number 34, Columbia, TN, 1981, p. 146.
__________
November 22, 1820 (first recorded deed forLawson)
Dickson County, Tennessee, Deeds, Book C, Page 486.
From: Joseph Hall Senr
To: Lawson Gunn
Description: 30 acres of land for $200 "This indenture ... between Joseph Hall Senr ... and Lawson Gunn ... the sum of TwoHundred Dollars ... parcel of land ... containing Thirty Acres ... lying in the first district on Garners Creek of Pine River ... "
__________
March 30,1827
"Lawson Gunn Enters Fifty acres of land in Dickson County on the head waters of Garners Creek Beginning 5 poles north of his No. East corner runsEast 65 poles thence South for compliment. Marth 30th 1827. (Entry #737)."
Dickson Record of Entries, Apr. 1824 - Apr. 1907, Microfilm Roll No. 98.
__________
1829 - 1837. Land Grants to Lawson Gunn (all on Garners Creek)
Dickson County, Tennessee, Land Grants, Book 11 
Gunn, Lawson (I12860)
 
2042 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1797, February 18
Deeds, Sumner County, Tennessee, Book 1, Page 448
From: Isaac Walton
To: Bryan Gardner
Description:220 acres for "two hundred pounds Virginia currency" This indenture made the Eighteenth day of February in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred & Ninety Seven between Isaac Walton of the State of Tennessee & Sumner County of the one part & Bryan Garner of the aforesaid State & County of the other part Whiteness that the said Isaac Walton for & In Consideration of the Sum of two hundred pounds Virginia currency, to him the said Isaac Walton in hand paid by the Bryan Garner the Receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath given granted bargained Sold conveyed & confirmed & by this presents doth give grant bargain Sell and alien & confirm unto the Bryan Garner his heirs and assigns forever two hundred & twenty acres of land lying in the aforesaid State & County whereon the said Bryan Garner now lives on. Beginning at a branch on Coll Mancoss line & running east one hundred & Sixty four poles to a hickory thence north two hundred & forty poles to a beech thence South one hundred and twelve poles to a boulder from thence a South west by the meanders of the branch to the Beginning with all its
appurtenances there to belonging or appertaining to the said Bryan Garner his heirs and assigns & the aforesaid Isaac Walton the aforesaid tract of land unto the said Bryan Garner his heirs and assigns against the Claim or Claims of all parsons whatsoever will forever Warent and Defend in Witness whereof the said Isaac Walton hath hereunto Set his hand and affixed his Seal the Day and year above written
// Registered & Examed October the
Signed Sealed & Delivered // 28th 1797
in presence of // Isaac Walton
(Seal)
Willis Horton //
John Gatlin// David Wilson
Regr
__________
PROBATE DATA FOR THE ESTATE OF BRYANT GARDNER
(Page numbers in parentheses are the page numbers in the probate books and court records which contain the original entries).
(Page 484). Pleas at the court house in the town of Gallatin before the Justices of Sumner County on the third Monday in December 1804, & twenty ninth year of American Independence ... On motion ordered that letters of
administration on the estate of Bryant Gardner decd. be granted to Isaac Walton and John Gardner who entered into bond to the Governor in the penal sum of five thousand dollars with James McKain and Lewis Crane securities and took the oath prescribed by law and returned an inventory of the goods & C. of said decd and fuly proved the same both of which are ordered to be recorded ... On motin ordered that the administrators of Bryant Gardner decd have the privilege of selling the personal estate of said decd. except the negroes belonging to sd estate. (SOURCE: Mrs. Walter Witherspoon, copyist, Tennessee Records of Sumner County Court Minutes, Vol. IV, 1801-1804, pp. 639-640).
(Page 194 E). Isaac Walton and John Gardner appointed guardians to Allen Gardner, William Gardner, Martin Gardner, Sally Gardner, and Betsy Gardner, minor orphans, 18 June 1806; bond of $3,000.00 with Edward Williams and Charles Dement, securities. (SOURCE: Gale W. Bamman, Sumner County, Tennessee Probate Data, 1787-1808, p. 62). (Page 36). Settlement with Walton and Gardner, guardians of heirs of Bryant Gardner, dec'd. 1807: property - 1 tract of land rented one year $50.00; 5 negroes hired. (same for 1808) "The expense of Allen Gardner in 1807 and 3 months in 1806: 15 months boarding $25.00, schooling 12 months $6.66, clothes, etc. - $49.16 total." Expenses 1808 -$42.62. William Gardner's expenses - 1807: $35 
Gardner, Bryant (I13080)
 
2043 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1806-1880
"Gardner, Olevia W. 19 May 1806 - 23 Jun 1880 Marr to MartinGardner 17 Apr 1823"
GARDNER CEMETERY
"1 7/10 mi. east of 31W at Millersville at the intersection of Pole Hill Road and Hogan Branch Road."
SumnerCounty, Tennessee, Cemetery Records compiled by Margaret Cummings Snider andJoan Hollis Yorgason (1981). 
Olivia W. (I12969)
 
2044 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1813 - Andrew Field as soldier in War of 1812
Index of Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers who served during the War of 1812, Microcopy No. 602, Roll No. 71, National Archives of the United States, 1934.
Fields, Andrew
5 Regiment Virginia Militia
War of 1812
Sergeant/Private
See alsoEdward Wilson
__________
1851 - Andrew asks brother to verify service record
Kimbro-Field: A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee, 1993, p. 63.
In 1813 Andrew volunteered for the 5th Regiment Virginia Militia. in a letter he wrote to his brother, James, on July 16, 1851, he asked James to verify his participation in the War of 1812: "For a particular Reason i wish you to get a Certificate for me to this amount. A. Field
"We do hereby Certify that Andrew Field formerly of bedford County & State of Virginia but now a Resident of Williamson County and State of Tennessee Marrched with us in the Company of Captain Willie Jones to the Town of Norfolk in the State of Virginia and there with us joined the army the 5th Regiment Commanded by Col parker & Lieut Col preston in the year 1813. Given under our Hands this day of "I wish you to sign this or one like it & get one or two moreto Do it & Oblige yours & A FIELD"
__________
From 1842 until 1852, Andrew and his wife, Franky corresponded with his brother in Virginia. The letters are all addressed from Andrew and Franky Field, Spring Hill, Williamson County, Tennessee, to James Field, Bedford County, Virginia. The early letters were mailed to the Fancy Grove Post Office in Bedford County, while the later ones were sent to Davis Mills. I have copied excerpts of the letters leaving the spelling and capitalization as it appeared in the original. I have, though, inserted a few commas and periods to make the reading a little easier. The orginals are in the possession of the family of Mrs. Carole Field Rakes Guedes of Orlando, Florida, a 3rd-great-granddaughter of James Field.
April 23, 1848
"Dear Brother & Sister it has been a Long time Since we Heard from you. but not withstanding that i again will Write to you to tell you that through the Blessings of Divine Providence we are Still Enjoying tolerable Good Health at this time and all our Children that lives About here is Generally well & the neighborhood is Generally Healthy at this
time. as I should be Glad to hear all about Your Children I will write to you about ours.
"Drury is living in Texas & is well pleased with the Country And Doing Very well there. He is a member of the Methodist Church there & also a member of the old Masonick fraternity And a Royal Arch mason at that.
Doshe Hurt is Livingin Henderson County in the west End of the State.
Jane Dawson & Jessee & John is All living in Maury County. Stephen (and) his family is Still Living with us & Elizabeth Williams is Living in this neighborhood. Her Husband is at this time at Nashville building a Suspension Bridge across the Cumberland River.
"Our Markets Here is Dull at this time. we made Great Crops of Cotten Last Year & now it is only worth $6 pr Hundred and Bacon Only 4 dollars pr Hundred & Very Plenty at that. flour $2 pr Hundred & Corn $1.25 cents pr barrel.
"The Great topick of talk about here is very unpopular Democratick Polk. Mexican war a Very Shameful thery of the Contemptible President of ours but I never Expected any Better of him for I knew him so well. as I know nothing of your Politicks whether an administration man or not I Do no wish to hurt your feelings but I do Hope that you Support the whig principles for I cannot Se how that modern Democracy Ever Got in the family of Field but Brother John Goes it Strong. Although Some years past He opposed that Principle. 
Field, Andrew (I12966)
 
2045 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1817-ca 1880: Sketch of John Murrell
John Murrell was born in 1817 in Dickson County. On December 17, 1835, he married Sarah Harris. John and Sarah had ten children. Sarah died before 1855, for on August 22, 1855, he married Charlotte "Lotty" Tolar. John and Lotty Murrell had ten children, among whom was Susan Ann, born March 14, 1866.
A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, p. 82.
__________
1874, April 8
Dickson County, Tennessee, Deeds, Book S, Page 429.
From: John Murrell
To: Mickins Murrell
Description: 50 acres of landfor $150.00
Location: Dickson County, District #1 ... near Jacob Erington's line running West of North with the Waverly road ... to a stake in the Said Line hollow on Jacob Eringtons line. 
Murrell, John (I13019)
 
2046 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1818: Sketch of Margaret Ann Simpson
Margaret Ann, a daughter of William and Margaret Ann Maddox Simpson, was born about 1818. Prior to 1843, she married William Hedge, and they had seven children. William died in 1855, and Margaret married William Carroll Gunn. William and Margaret Gunn had two children, James Carroll and Avery
Edward. 
Simpson, Margaret Ann (I12859)
 
2047 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1825-1872: Sketch of Lucy Redden
Lucy Redden was born in Dickson County, Tennessee, about 1825. Little is known about her. The 1850 census of Dickson County shows her living in the household of Lucy Redden (age 66), along with Nancy (age 44), Sydney
L. (age 24), Mary (age 23), George L. (age 7), Frances (age 2), and W. B. (age 28).
The elder Lucy Redden was probably her mother or grandmother. Nancy Redden may have been her mother.
About 1850, Lucy married John H. Moore. By 1860, they had five children: F. L., James B.,William Frank, John T., and Elizabeth. John died in the War Between the States leaving Lucy a widow at the age of 38.
Lucy's son, Frank, wrote of the hardships the family endured following the death of his father: "I was six years old when my father got killed. My mother was a very poor woman, left with five little children, three boys and two girls. My uncle, Wiley Redden, moved us to a little house on his farm on Piney. My mother's uncles and other kinfolks kept us from starving until we got big enough to work." (Frank Moore, Dickson County Herald, November 19, 1937).
Lucy died about 1872.
Kimbro-Field: A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 59-60. 
Redden, Lucy (I12889)
 
2048 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1825-1872: Sketch of Lucy Redden
Lucy Redden was born in Dickson County, Tennessee, about 1825. Little is known about her. The 1850 census of Dickson County shows her living in the household of Lucy Redden (age 66), along with Nancy (age 44), Sydney L. (age 24), Mary (age 23), George L. (age 7), Frances (age 2), and W. B.
(age 28).
The elder Lucy Redden was probably her mother or grandmother. Nancy Redden may have been her mother. About 1850, Lucy married John H. Moore. By 1860, they had five children: F. L., James B.,William Frank, John T., and Elizabeth. John died in the War Between the States leaving Lucy a widow at the age of 38. Lucy's son, Frank, wrote of the hardships the family endured following
the death of his father: "I was six years old when my father got killed. My mother was a very
poor woman, left with five little children, three boys and two girls. My uncle, Wiley Redden, moved us to a little house on his farm on Piney. My mother's uncles and otherkinfolks kept us from starving until we got big enough to work." (Frank Moore, Dickson County Herald, November 19,
1937).
Lucy died about 1872.
Kimbro-Field: A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 59-60. 
Moore, Elizabeth (I12853)
 
2049 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1827-1863: Sketch of John H. Moore
John H. Moore was born about 1827 in Dickson County. His mother's name was Frances (born about 1805), but I have been unable to determine the name of his father. Census records of Dickson County show that in 1850, John was living at home With his mother, his brother, Bail, and two sisters, Nancy and Sarah. John married Lucy Redden about 1850 and they had five children. By 1860, John and his family were living in Hickman County where he was overseer of the Nunnelly Plantation.
On October 22, 1861, he volunteered at Camp Cheatham for the 42nd Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army. In January of the following year he was discharged. His captain, Josiah R. Hubbard, wrote of him: "I certify that the soldier named John H. Moore Second Sergeant of Capt. Hubbards Company (A) of the 42 Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers of the Confederate States Army (?) in Hickman County in the State of Tennessee (remainder of sentence illegible) ... Six feet high Sullen complexion gray eyes black hair and by profession a farmer was enlisted by Lieutenant Hunt at Camp Cheatham Tennessee and is now entitled to a discharge by reason of disease of the kidneys causing partial Paralysis."
"The said Sergeant John H. Moore has never been paid any thing to this date."
"There is due him fifty three dollars & twenty Seven cents pay." "There is due him twelve dollars and thirty cents on account of clothing not drawn in kind. He is not indebted to the Confederate States in any sum on account of extra clothing. He has no account with (?) at all. Given induplicate at Camp Wilderness near Clarksville Tenn Jany 26, 1862." (Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served In Organizations from Tennessee, 42nd Infantry, MF Roll #288).
Apparently, John was forced to leave the service and didn't want to quit. Later, he reenlisted in Baxter's Battery. On April 27, 1863, while a member of that unit, he died at Tullahoma, Tennessee, probably from the kidney disease. (I have found no microfilm re-create his service in Baxter's Battery, but Confederate records for 1863-1865 are
sketchy). (The Military Annals of Tennessee, Confederate, compiled from original and official sources, Edited by John Berrien Lindsey, M.D., D.D., The Reprint Company Publishers: Spartanburg, S.C., 1974, p. 868).
Kimbro-Field:A History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 58-59.
(On July 25, 1992, Kenneth Kimbro, great-great-grandson of John H. Moore, was elected a member of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, Camp No. 28, Sons of Confederate Veterans, on the war record of John Moore).
__________
1863, April 27: Baxter's Battery
JOHN MOORE - Baxter's Battery
Died 27 April 1863 at Tullahoma. Dickson County Herald, 19 Nov. 1937, says that John Moore, killed in war, also had brother J. B. Moore (Note: His brother was W. B., not J. B.) also who was killed. He married Lucy Redden and their children were: 1. W. Frank, born 20 Jan. 1856 Turkey Creek married Molly Manley
2. John
3. James Moore of Lyles
4. Daughter married Charles Chappell
5. Daughter married Jimmy Kimbro
Dickson County Handbook by Jill Knight Garrett, Southern Historical Press: Easley, S.C., 1984, p. 211. 
Moore, John H. (I12888)
 
2050 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1859, Date of Import: Dec 20, 2000]
1831 - 1915 Sketch of William Carroll Gunn
"Lawson and Mary Gunn had eleven children. The seventh child was William Carroll, corn August 14, 1831.William Carroll married Margaret Ann Simpson Hedge, the widow of William Carroll Hedge. At the time of their marriage, Margaret Ann had seven children by her first marriage. By 1860 the Gunns had two more children, James Carrolland Avery Edward. "On December 16, 1862, William Carroll and three of his brothers, Henry C., John R., and Andrew J., volunteered for the Confederate Army. By
July of 1863, all four of the Gunns had left the army and come home. I have found no explanation of why they left. "In the later part of his life, William Carroll was known as 'Uncle Billy' Gunn. He became a Methodist preacher and preached at Indian Creek, Fews Chapel, and Hurricane Chapel.
"In 1894 New Hope Methodist Church was built on land donated by William Carroll's brother, Wash Gunn. On August 8, 1898, William Carroll and Margaret Ann sold the church an additional two acres for $50.00, and a new parsonage was built.
"By 1915 New Hope was a thriving little church. Kate Caroline Wright Luther wrote of a great revival that was held that year: "'It was in August 1915, during the Wilson pastorate that the second memorable revival was held -there being 22 conversions and 16 additions to the church. In connection with this revival we are reminded of the truth of the Bible statement 'The prayer of a righteous man availeth much,' because 'Uncle Billy' Gunn had been praying for this revival for several years. I was a small child at this time butI remember clearly seeing his face wreathed in smiles though the tears werestreaming from his eyes. And I imagine he felt as one of old who said, 'Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace' for he said he could not die satisfied until this revival had come about. He selected as the text for his funeral the following: 'I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith,' and in a few short months he went to his reward.' (Humphreys County Heritage, Waverly, Tennessee, Vol. 2, p. 32).
"The youngest child of William Carroll and Margaret Ann Gunn was Avery Edward (our direct ancestor)."
Kimbro-Field: A Family History of the Kimbro and Field Families of Middle Tennessee by Kenneth Kimbro, 1992, pp. 54-55.
__________
December 16, 1862 - William Carroll in Confederate Army
Gunn, Wm. C. Co. C,24 Batt'n, Tennessee Sharp Shooters (Maney's Battalion)
Sergeant/Sergeant
Muster Rolls:
Feb 28, 1863 - Present
Enlisted: Dec 16, 1862, Humphreys County, Tenn. by Capt. McAdoo for 3 Dec 16, 1862 to Feb 28, 1863 - Present
Last Paid: "Pay due since enlisted"
Mar & Apr, 1863 - Present
July & Aug, 1863
Last Paid by Capt Dahull(?)
Absent
"Deserted 2nd July on retreat from Tullahoma"
Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served In Organizations from Tennessee, MF Roll #221
__________
February 12, 1870
Humphreys County, Tennessee, Deeds, Book S, Page 301.
From: William Few,et. al.
To: W. C. gunn
Description: 110 acres of land for $320
"For and in consideration of the sum of three hundred & twenty dollars ... we have ... sold ... to W. C. Gunn ... real estate lying ... on little Hurricane CreekCivil district No. 10 bearing the tract of land on which W C Hedge resides at the time of his death Beginning on a Black Walnut & Mulberry the south westCorner of a survey granted to Harmark Milidas by the State of North CarolinaGrant No. 125 ... Containing by estimation one hundred and ten acres ... this the 12 day of February 1870."
Signatures or marks by: William Few, W. L.Few, J. R. Gunn, S. G. Hedge, Cynthia Few, Mary Ann Gunn, Martha M. Few.
__________
August 8, 1898
Humphreys County, TN 
Gunn, William Carroll (I12858)
 

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